2019/20 Elm Class Term 5

Term Themes: Young Entrepreneurs and Chocolate

Literacy – Chocolate, Sugar and Business

Learning goals we achieved throughout the term:

  • We learned about the origins of chocolate and sugar within human society.
  • We learned the problems in society that have been created by chocolate, e.g. environmental problems or income inequality.
  • We comprehended and analysed excerpts from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and how the novel represented cacao bean workers compared to working conditions of the modern cacao bean harvesting industry.
  • We learned about business, business terminology and how business calculations from mathematics effect how one pitches their business.
  • We created our own advertising modeled after modern advertising for our own businesses.
  • We created an individual business plan which was based on a meaningful product or service which people would buy.
  • We wrote business pitches designed to persuade investors to believe in their company so as to make a profit.

History and Geography

In History and Geography we looked at the trade of sugar and chocolate both today and back in the 18th century. In conjunction to entrepreneurship, we learned about the excesses and abuses that can come from business. A large focus was on the slave trade and the middle passage. We analysed why slavery was practised in the first place, the human horrors of slavery and the fundamental importance of paying a fair wage to all.

Young Entrepreneurs – We came, we saw, we sold!

Pupils worked to create their own businesses, be it in a group or individually. We sold a range of products: soap, minerals, touchscreen pens, Greek clay tablets, origami instruction manuals, painted wood, bracelets, comic books and cards.

The Business Process

  • Elms got their idea and turned it into a business plan.
  • Elms pitched their plan to the bank while asking for a loan.
  • The bank gave Elms a loan to purchase the goods that they needed for their business.
  • Elms created their products.
  • Elms sold their products to parents and other children for an income.
  • Elms paid back their loans, paid their taxes and calculated their profits.
  • The proceeds have been set aside for charity.

The Global Forest Fund of Eco-Schools

All profits from the business project have gone into a fund from Eco-Schools, the largest global sustainable schools programme. Pupils wrote about where the money could best be put to use and came up with issues such as cleaning up rivers, replanting forests and helping less fortunate individuals have better, more sustainable lives. We will make a significant contribution to the Global Forest Fund.

For more information, click on the links below:

Eco-schools: https://www.ecoschools.global/

Global Forest Fund: https://www.gff.global/

Elms got a class treat for all of their hard work: Accrobranche

ICT

Oaks had a special visit from Joshua Bradfield, a former teaching aide at the school and programmer for the Novasys Ingénierie of the Pactenovation Group. He broke down the fundamentals of programming as a series of if->then statements and loops with varying levels of complexity. Children then programmed Micro:bits, the Mbot and Scratch. Even more exciting, pupils had the chance to help Joshua program the big robot like he would have for work.

Our robot guest talked, sang and danced like the children watching it.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

It was a fun and productive term! We wish you all a happy summer holiday and will see you next year!

2019/20 Oak Class Term 5

Term Themes: Young Entrepreneurs and Chocolate

Literacy – Chocolate, Sugar and Business

Learning goals we achieved throughout the term:

  • We learned about the origins of chocolate and sugar within human society.
  • We learned the problems in society that have been created by chocolate, e.g. environmental problems or income inequality.
  • We comprehended and analysed excerpts from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and how the novel represented cacao bean workers compared to working conditions of the modern cacao bean harvesting industry.
  • We learned about business, business terminology and how business calculations from mathematics effect how one pitches their business.
  • We created our own advertising modeled after modern advertising for our own businesses.
  • We created an individual business plan which was based on a meaningful product or service which people would buy.
  • We wrote business pitches designed to persuade investors to believe in their company so as to make a profit.

History and Geography

In History and Geography we looked at the trade of sugar and chocolate both today and back in the 18th century. In conjunction to entrepreneurship, we learned about the excesses and abuses that can come from business. A large focus was on the slave trade and the middle passage. We analysed why slavery was practised in the first place, the human horrors of slavery and the fundamental importance of paying a fair wage to all.

Young Entrepreneurs – We came, we saw, we sold!

Pupils worked to create their own businesses, be it in a group or individually. We sold a range of products: soap, minerals, touchscreen pens, Greek clay tablets, origami instruction manuals, painted wood, bracelets, comic books and cards.

The Business Process

  • Oaks got their idea and turned it into a business plan.
  • Oaks pitched their plan to the bank while asking for a loan.
  • The bank gave Oaks a loan to purchase the goods that they needed for their business.
  • Oaks created their products.
  • Oaks sold their products to parents and other children for an income.
  • Oaks paid back their loans, paid their taxes and calculated their profits.
  • The proceeds have been set aside for charity.

The Global Forest Fund of Eco-Schools

All profits from the business project have gone into a fund from Eco-Schools, the largest global sustainable schools programme. Pupils wrote about where the money could best be put to use and came up with issues such as cleaning up rivers, replanting forests and helping less fortunate individuals have better, more sustainable lives. We will make a significant contribution to the Global Forest Fund.

For more information, click on the links below:

Eco-schools: https://www.ecoschools.global/

Global Forest Fund: https://www.gff.global/

As a reward for their hard work, Oaks had a class treat: Accrobranche

ICT

Oaks had a special visit from Joshua Bradfield, a former teaching aide at the school and programmer for the Novasys Ingénierie of the Pactenovation Group. He broke down the fundamentals of programming as a series of if->then decisions and loops with varying levels of complexity. Pupils then programmed Micro:bits, the Mbot and Scratch. Even more exciting, pupils had the chance to help Joshua program the big robot like he would have for work.

Our robot guest talked, sang and danced like the children watching it.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

It was a fun and productive term! We wish you all a happy summer holiday and will see you next year!

2019/20 Oak Class Term 4

In school – whether at school or at home!

Main Term Theme: Robots

Sub Term Theme: Cosmetics

Bonus Term Theme Thrust Upon Us: COVID-19

Literacy – Robots in Literature

Term Book: The Iron Man – By Ted Hughes (1968)

Learning Outcomes for Oaks in Literacy:

  • Read articles, watched videos, and learned about different types of robots currently in existence.
  • Presented in front of the class about a robot they had independently researched.
  • Were introduced to classical science fiction literature in the form of The Iron Man by Ted Hughes (1968).
  • Wrote a story about a picnic using literary techniques such as imagery or similes.
  • Wrote a news article written in a factual style.
  • Wrote a book review highlighting major themes of the book without revealing pertinent information.
  • Created a song related to their book.
  • Practised identifying and properly conjugating the three different conditional tenses.
  • Practised direct speech and reported speech.
Pupil reading The Iron Man.

The conclusion of a book review:

The enormous space dragon as big as the Earth laughed because he was sure to be superior to the Iron Man, so he accepted the challenge against the Iron Man. In the end, the dragon lost the bet.

The book leaves us with a little moral: Winning is not about size!

Breaking news story:

Is the Iron Man the answer to destroying the dragon?

A week ago a giant dragon landed on Australia, threatening to destroy the Earth unless it’s demands are filled, and as human weapons are useless against the dragon, our last hope is the iron-eating Iron Man.

An Oak singing about The Iron Man at home.

ICT – Computer Programming and Robots

In ICT, pupils built programmable robots and learned basic programming (movement, speech) through the program Scratch.

History (in English and French)

Robotics – Communication Technology – Cosmetics – COVID-19

Pupils learned about the following topics in history class in either French or English:

  • Different methods of communication (technological development and body language interpretation).
  • Advances in artificial intelligence as seen in the triumph of an IBM computer Deep Blue against the Chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov in 1997.
  • The Coronavirus, how it works, its place in history and its vast impact on human society.
  • The history of cosmetics and its meaning in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome and today.

Why did ancient peoples wear makeup?

Pupil response: To look beautiful, show off their wealth, and to protect their skin from the sun, insects and infections.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

FISP – Committed to education, no matter the place!

2019/20 Elm Class Term 4

In school – whether at school or at home!

Main Term Theme: Robots

Sub Term Theme: Cosmetics

Bonus Term Theme Thrust Upon Us: COVID-19

Literacy – Robots in Literature

AI portrayed in pop culture. Pictured is the HAL 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey

Learning Outcomes for Elms in Literacy:

  • Read articles, watched videos, and learned about different types of robots currently in existence.
  • Presented in front of the class about a robot they had independently researched.
  • Learned about how robots have been represented in science fiction, such as Stanley Kubrick’s HAL 9000 character from 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).
  • Were introduced to classical science fiction literature. Pupils either read The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams (1979) or The Iron Man by Ted Hughes (1968).
  • Wrote a story about a picnic using literary techniques such as imagery or similes.
  • Wrote a news article written in a factual style.
  • Wrote a book review highlighting major themes of the book without revealing pertinent information.
  • Created a song related to their book.
  • One Elm read and analysed the novel Fever: 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson and compared it to the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Practised identifying and properly conjugating the three different conditional tenses.
  • Practised direct speech and reported speech.

Student work sample:

Y elps off pain from the sickness,
E nding life is a horrible business.
L ife was shredding
L ots of poor lives begging
O ff to the grave, spirits will fly
W e sure hope this will soon go by!

F irst from the bloodstream, to the liver,
E veryone desperately trying to be clean.
V ictoriously conquering the plague,
E veryone could relate,
R isking the horrible fate.

Sample of an Elm’s song

ICT – Computer Programming and Robots

In ICT, pupils built programmable robots and learned basic programming (movement, speech) through the program Scratch.

Additionally, pupils made games and icons using BBC Microbits.

History (in English and French)

Robotics – Communication Technology – Cosmetics – COVID-19

Pupils learned about the following topics in history class in either French or English:

  • Different methods of communication (technological development and body language interpretation).
  • Advances in artificial intelligence as seen in the triumph of an IBM computer Deep Blue against the Chess Grandmaster Garry Kasparov in 1997.
  • The Coronavirus, how it works, its place in history and its vast impact on human society.
  • The history of cosmetics and its meaning in Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome and today.

Why do women wear makeup?

Pupil response: Many cultures use makeup to look more attractive and to change or preserve their appearance. It can make them feel more confident. Women also put it on to express who they are.

Why did ancient peoples wear make-up?

To protect their face from the sun or their eyes from infections and insects.
Also, rich people wanted to show how powerful they were because poor people didn’t use make-up (or it was at least of a lower quality).

Why is advertising and marketing important for cosmetics?

Pupil response: People advertise makeup to gain a profit. Charles Revson showed people lipstick and nail polishes that were the same color as other makeup people had. This made him a lot of money, as it became popular. People also go for things that are more expensive because they tend to be in higher quality. For example, say there were 2 eye shadows: one for $8, and one for $3. If a person sees both, they go for the $8 eye shadow.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

FISP – Committed to education, no matter the place!

2019/20 Oak Class Term 3

Term Theme: Superhumans – They Made A Difference

Term 3 Literacy

Biography: Research -> Summary-> Presentation

In Literacy class, Oaks were busy learning about all kinds of famous historical figures throughout the ages.

First they were exposed to a great number of different biographies.

Then they were challenged to write their own summaries on these biographical figures.

Finally they needed to make a poster on the computer to present their biographical figures.

In the meantime, COMMA, there was a large focus on the grammar of cohesion. Rather than listing out facts, pupils were learning about fronted adverbials and connecting words to better connect a story and create a narrative about somebody’s life.

Consequently, not every sentence started with ‘he’ or ‘she’, and the writing flowed better.

The template with which every student worked with.

There was a definitive structure which was followed when analysing biographies. Whether it be Martin Luther King Jr. or Leonardo da Vinci, they all had an origin story (early life), a job of some sort (career), something great that they achieved (accomplishments) and a reason they’re remembered still today (legacy).

Big thanks to Ducksters.com for providing most of the biographies. Here is a list of people we analysed thanks to them.

Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein, Alexander the Great, Archimedes, Aristotle, Charlie Chaplain, Cleopatra, Frères Lumière, Galileo, Gandhi, Isaac Newton, Karl Marx, Leonardo da Vinci, Louis Pasteur, Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Teresa, Napoleon, Orville/Wilbur Wright, Pierre/Marie Curry, Plato, Socrates, Thomas Edison, Walt Disney

Literacy Objectives Covered:

  • To learn time connectives in order to better order a biography in chronological order.
  • To understand that biographies give an account of a person’s life and achievements.
  • To structure biographies so as to include early life, career, achievements, legacy.
  • To comprehend and organise the facts from research to create a larger narrative about the person.
  • To learn about cohesion and how paragraphs connect to construct a narrative.
  • To present one’s work in a way that is easily comprehensible and interactive with the audience.

Guided Reading

Pupils practised reading books which challenged their level with an adult monitoring their reading and comprehension questions or activities to follow.

The books are the following:

  • A Lion in the Bedroom by Readworks.org
  • Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

History/IPC

In both history and the French bilingual section, much of the term was spent on the following topics:

  • Scientists and Inventors
  • Democracy vs. Dictatorship
  • Civil Rights
  • Famous Monuments

History Objectives Covered:

  • To speak of history in both English and French.
  • To see how ancient people solved big questions such as figuring out the circumference of the Earth or the categorisation of animals.
  • To recreate science experiments and practise the scientific method.
  • To learn about the importance of humanity and what can happen when humanity is not properly valued.
  • To see that dictatorship can come from within a democracy and that one must recognize the signs of dictatorship in order to avoid it.
  • To learn about democracy and its different forms and origins.
  • To learn about dictatorship and its focus on unity and creating differences with ‘others’.
  • To appreciate the gravity and negative significance of segregation.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

ICT / Robotics Workshop

We made biographies, presentation slides, museum tickets, and played with robots.

Oaks receiving instructions on how to guide and lead robots which sense colour.
A robot which follows and changes into the colour it senses.
Pupils also programmed their robot to go where they directed it.

ICT Objectives Covered:

  • To research and find information on a historical figure.
  • To create presentation slides which are aesthetic, purposeful and in order.
  • To find, copy, paste and resize images to make an aesthetic presentation.
  • To successfully navigate Ducksters.com and find information you are looking for.
  • To practise synthesizing and typing skills.
  • To make aesthetically pleasing museum tickets which teach symmetry and computer design skills.

End of Term Museum

Oaks ended the term by showing younger pupils and parents their work from the term.

2019/20 Elm Class Term 3

Term Theme: It Made A Difference

They Made A Difference

Term 3 Literacy

Biography: Research -> Summary-> Presentation

In Literacy class, Elms were busy learning about all kinds of famous historical figures throughout the ages.

First they were exposed to a great number of different biographies.

Then they were challenged to write their own summaries on these biographical figures.

Finally they needed to make a poster on the computer to present their biographical figures.

In the meantime, COMMA, there was a large focus on the grammar of cohesion. Rather than listing out facts, pupils were learning about fronted adverbials and connecting words to better connect a story and create a narrative about somebody’s life.

Consequently, not every sentence started with ‘he’ or ‘she’, and the writing flowed better.

The template with which every student worked with.

There was a definitive structure which was followed when analysing biographies. Whether it be Martin Luther King Jr. or Leonardo da Vinci, they all had an origin story (early life), a job of some sort (career), something great that they achieved (accomplishments) and a reason they’re remembered still today (legacy).

Big thanks to Ducksters.com for providing most of the biographies. Here is a list of people we analysed thanks to them.

Abraham Lincoln, Albert Einstein, Alexander the Great, Archimedes, Aristotle, Charlie Chaplain, Cleopatra, Frères Lumière, Galileo, Gandhi, Isaac Newton, Karl Marx, Leonardo da Vinci, Louis Pasteur, Martin Luther King Jr., Mother Teresa, Napoleon, Orville/Wilbur Wright, Pierre/Marie Curry, Plato, Socrates, Thomas Edison, Walt Disney

Literacy Objectives Covered:

  • To learn time connectives in order to better order a biography in chronological order.
  • To understand that biographies give an account of a person’s life and achievements.
  • To structure biographies so as to include early life, career, achievements, legacy.
  • To comprehend and organise the facts from research to create a larger narrative about the person.
  • To learn about cohesion and how paragraphs connect to construct a narrative.
  • To present one’s work in a way that is easily comprehensible and interactive with the audience.

Guided Reading

Pupils practised reading books which challenged their level with an adult monitoring their reading and comprehension questions or activities to follow.

The books are the following:

  • Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
  • Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson

History/IMYC

In both history and the French bilingual section, much of the term was spent on the following topics:

  • Scientists and Inventors
  • Democracy vs. Dictatorship
  • Civil Rights
  • Famous Monuments

History Objectives Covered:

  • To speak of history in both English and French.
  • To see how ancient people solved big questions such as figuring out the circumference of the Earth or the categorisation of animals.
  • To recreate science experiments and practise the scientific method.
  • To learn about the importance of humanity and what can happen when humanity is not properly valued.
  • To see that dictatorship can come from within a democracy and that one must recognize the signs of dictatorship in order to avoid it.
  • To learn about democracy and its different forms and origins.
  • To learn about dictatorship and its focus on unity and creating differences with ‘others’.
  • To appreciate the gravity and negative significance of segregation.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

ICT / Robotics Workshop

We made biographies, presentation slides, museum tickets, and played with robots.

Programming a robot where to go and what to do
Elms in the middle of their robotics workshop
Pupil finding an image to create their biography

ICT Objectives Covered:

  • To research and find information on a historical figure.
  • To create presentation slides which are aesthetic, purposeful and in order.
  • To find, copy, paste and resize images to make an aesthetic presentation.
  • To successfully navigate Ducksters.com and find information you are looking for.
  • To practise synthesizing and typing skills.
  • To make aesthetically pleasing museum tickets which teach symmetry and computer design skills.

End of Term Museum

Elms finished the term by showing their work to parents and younger pupils at a museum.

2019/20 Elm Class Term 2

Creativity and Renewal

Elms were busy both preparing a Christmas show…

and learning about the renewal of ideas in the Renaissance!

What did we do in Literacy?

  • We learned about science and the scientific revolution in history, so working with that theme, we read through multiple scientific texts and answered comprehension questions related to each theme. The scientific method changed the way people viewed the world, and has led to much information and discovery in the form of science. Scientific articles included topics such as the iterative process in inventing a mouthpiece music controller or the the problem of space junk.
  • Wrote summaries about the books they were reading and about space junk.
  • Practised songs for the school play, including learning how to sing a song in Dutch.
  • Practised lines for the school play, with a focus on tone, fluency and articulation.
  • Read the class book How to Train Your Dragon.
  • Researched different characteristics of animals, categorised information in their research notes, and wrote a report based off of their researched animal.
  • Practised identifying parts of speech, especially nouns and verbs.

What did we do in ICT?

Elms were busy making brochures for the show!

Pupils made brochures and posters to inform and advertise parents about the Christmas show. Brochures included practising adding and adjusting photos, changing fonts, adding sections into a word program, changing the orientation of the paper on the computer, and most of all, engaging with the show in a more detailed manner.

The following was in pupil-made brochures:

  • A title page using a picture of the child-made poster
  • A list of characters with actors’ names
  • A list of songs with credit to the dancers
  • A summary of the plot
  • Images of the production of the show
  • Logistical details of when and where it is

History of the Renaissance – Renewed thinking

The main purpose and takeaway from our Renaissance unit was how a few people thought differently than before and created something much bigger than themselves. We learned the following about science in the Renaissance:

  • The scientific revolution and the scientific method. People, instead of relying solely on religious or mythical explanations to explain the world around them, distilled causes and effects through one change (one dependent variable) at a time.
  • How scientists and other thinkers challenged the old order, especially the Catholic Church. Pupils learned that it was not easy at all to challenge authority.
  • Geocentrism vs heliocentrism. We learned that Nicholas Copernicus was the first to successfully publish the theory of heliocentrism without being totally discredited (he was not the first to create the theory, just the most well-known one). Copernicus’ ideas were later reinforced by Galileo Galilei.
  • That Galileo recorded precise exact coordinates and trajectories of stars/planets though daily observation and invented a telescope to do so, proving the Earth revolved around the sun, not the other way around.
  • That the sun is the centre of our solar system. Furthermore, the Earth is not the centre of the universe.
  • That Leonardo da Vinci made some very interesting machine designs far before they were invented, such as the helicopter, tank and machine gun.

Elms learned that ideas spread faster than ever due to the printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg.

We spent time learning and appreciating the invention of the printing press, which made the spread of ideas exponentially faster and the creation of books exponentially easier. To demonstrate this point, pupils learned that there were an estimated 30,000 books around the invention of the printing press. 50 years after the invention of the printing press, there were between 8 to 20 million books, a couple orders of magnitude greater than before. Scientific ideas spread like wildfire, the Catholic church lost influence, and people started to read. Pupils appreciated their books a little bit more.

The arts, developments, and daily life in the Renaissance.

There was a lot of development during the Renaissance in art, architecture, military and science, but pupils learned that much stayed the same. They compared life for peasants and nobles between the Medieval era and Renaissance era and came to the conclusion that life was mostly the same for peasants and somewhat different for nobles. They did learn some major differences, which follows as such:

  • Art developed, with greater focus on human anatomical accuracy and perspective.
  • Architecture developed, such as castles becoming more decorative and less protective.
  • New weapons came into existence, making armour more and more obsolete as time passed and muskets developed.
  • Science began making advances in our understanding of the world, paving the way for change.

Renaissance History en Français

In the French part of history classes, pupils learned about French architecture and art, such as about the Château de Chambord. They compared Medieval and Renaissance times in French, consolidating what they had learned in the English section of history. One activity, as pictured below, was to categorise images which were either Medieval or Renaissance.

As part of the printing press unit, Oaks and Elms made their own paper from scratch.

They then created feather pens…

to write a message on their paper.

For more information about what Elms did in French and the French section of history, download the link below.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

Happy holidays, see you all in 2020! – Mr. Tucker

2019/20 Oak Class Term 2

Creativity and Renewal

Oaks were busy both preparing a Christmas show…

and learning about the renewal of ideas in the Renaissance!

What did we do in Literacy?

  • We learned about science and the scientific revolution in history, so working with that theme, we read through multiple scientific texts and answered comprehension questions related to each theme. The scientific method changed the way people viewed the world, and has led to much information and discovery in the form of science. Scientific articles included topics such as the possible origin of allergies, the ecosystem of ants and the classification of Pluto as a dwarf planet.
  • Wrote summaries about the books they were reading and about Pluto the dwarf planet.
  • Practised songs for the school play, including learning how to sing a song in Dutch.
  • Practised lines for the school play, with a focus on tone, fluency and articulation.
  • Read the class book Boy in the Back of the Classroom.
  • Researched different characteristics of animals, categorised information in their research notes, and wrote a report based off of their researched animal.
  • Practised identifying parts of speech, especially nouns and verbs.

What did we do in ICT?

Oaks were busy making brochures for the show!

Pupils made brochures and posters to inform and advertise parents about the Christmas show. Brochures included practising adding and adjusting photos, changing fonts, adding sections into a word program, changing the orientation of the paper on the computer, and most of all, engaging with the show in a more detailed manner.

The following was in pupil-made brochures:

  • A title page using a picture of the child-made poster
  • A list of characters with actors’ names
  • A list of songs with credit to the dancers
  • A summary of the plot
  • Images of the production of the show
  • Logistical details of when and where it is

History of the Renaissance – Renewed thinking

The main purpose and takeaway from our Renaissance unit was how a few people thought differently than before and created something much bigger than themselves. We learned the following about science in the Renaissance:

  • The scientific revolution and the scientific method. People, instead of relying solely on religious or mythical explanations to explain the world around them, distilled causes and effects through one change (one dependent variable) at a time.
  • How scientists and other thinkers challenged the old order, especially the Catholic Church. Pupils learned that it was not easy at all to challenge authority.
  • Geocentrism vs heliocentrism. We learned that Nicholas Copernicus was the first to successfully publish the theory of heliocentrism without being totally discredited (he was not the first to create the theory, just the most well-known one). Copernicus’ ideas were later reinforced by Galileo Galilei.
  • That Galileo recorded precise exact coordinates and trajectories of stars/planets though daily observation and invented a telescope to do so, proving the Earth revolved around the sun, not the other way around.
  • That the sun is the centre of our solar system. Furthermore, the Earth is not the centre of the universe.
  • That Leonardo da Vinci made some very interesting machine designs far before they were invented, such as the helicopter, tank and machine gun.

Oaks learned that ideas spread faster than ever due to the printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg.

We spent time learning and appreciating the invention of the printing press, which made the spread of ideas exponentially faster and the creation of books exponentially easier. To demonstrate this point, pupils learned that there were an estimated 30,000 books around the invention of the printing press. 50 years after the invention of the printing press, there were between 8 to 20 million books, a couple orders of magnitude greater than before. Scientific ideas spread like wildfire, the Catholic church lost influence, and people started to read. Children appreciated their books a little bit more.

The arts, developments, and daily life in the Renaissance.

There was a lot of development during the Renaissance in art, architecture, military and science, but pupils learned that much stayed the same. They compared life for peasants and nobles between the Medieval era and Renaissance era and came to the conclusion that life was mostly the same for peasants and somewhat different for nobles. They did learn some major differences, which follows as such:

  • Art developed, with greater focus on human anatomical accuracy and perspective.
  • Architecture developed, such as castles becoming more decorative and less protective.
  • New weapons came into existence, making armour more and more obsolete as time passed and muskets developed.
  • Science began making advances in our understanding of the world, paving the way for change.

Renaissance History en Français

In the French part of history classes, pupils learned about French architecture and art, such as about the Château de Chambord. They compared Medieval and Renaissance times in French, consolidating what they had learned in the English section of history. One activity, as pictured below, was to categorise images which were either Medieval or Renaissance.

As part of the printing press unit, Oaks and Elms made their own paper from scratch.

They then created feather pens…

to write a message on their paper.

For more information about what Oaks did in French and the French section of history, download the link below.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

Happy holidays, see you all in 2020! – Mr. Tucker

2019/20 Oak Class – Term 1

Nature and Respect

The theme this term was about respect both with one another and with nature. We looked at topics such as protecting the global environment, how Medieval people worked with nature to live, and how we can use nature (such as apples) to create something manmade (such as apple pie). It’s been a busy term, here’s a look at some of what Oaks have been up to in their different core subjects.

Literacy

  • Introductory letters: Each student wrote a letter to introduce themselves to the class.
  • Apple pie recipe: Students practised writing and following instructions, which led to making our own apple pie and later selling it.
  • Persuasive letter to Marianne asking for a loan: Students wrote Marianne a letter asking for a loan to introduce the concept of capital with the promise of a return on investment.
  • Medieval Storytelling: Students compared the narrative tales of William Tell and Snow White.
  • Playscript: Read a playscript on William Tell and later re-enacted it.
  • Class book – The Boy at the Back of the Classroom by Onjali Q. Rauf, which explores the integration of a Syrian refugee into a typical British classroom.
  • Through these different forms of text, students practised grammar such as simple past tense and connectives. They also practised structures commonly found in texts listed above and challenged to expand their vocabulary. We will continue to work on these fundamentals throughout the academic year.

Bilingual History and Geography

Pupils learned about the Medieval way of life.

Then students needed to winnow the wheat.

After winnowing, students milled the grains into flour.

We made bread dough with our self-milled flour.

Additionally, we learned about Medieval clothing and made our own.

We baked the bread while learning about Medieval food.

We also danced a Medieval dance!

The objectives of this term were to learn about the characteristics of Medieval society and its people. We focused heavily on social status and how it worked with the system of Feudalism as a whole. For example, through winnowing and milling grains ourselves, we learned concretely how much work went into making a single loaf of bread, which gave students a basis for understanding why white bread would be for the richer nobles while brown, coarse bread was for the peasants. We also looked at Medieval clothing, housing and other aspects of general life to build an idea of how people lived in the past and how that compares to today.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

La découverte de la période médiévale à travers différentes activités culturelles, artistiques et culinaires.

Becoming aware of our Earth

We learned about the impact of global climate change throughout the weeks of Global Climate strikes. Considering the term was about nature and responsibility, it was perfect timing, and there’s no time better to start learning about the environment than today. Caro came in as a guest speaker to educate us on how we can live a zero-waste life in order to stop wasting plastic. We learned a lot from her talk and challenged ourselves to waste less and help our planet today.

ICT / Computer Class

Students were introduced to touch typing and Excel spreadsheets. First we practised how to type with our fingers in the right place, particularly focused on typing with two hands. We will continue to work on this skill throughout the academic year. Later we took our apple pie business and itemised the expenses and income of the business on a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet proved to be an excellent introduction into the world of accounting, business, and programming. Students itemised the inventory needed to make apple pie (e.g. apples, flour, butter, sugar), but then used the computer to multiply the price and quantity of the ingredients and add them together for a final expense. We did the same for income and subtracted the final income and expense to calculate the profit. The spreadsheet worked so that any change of inventory would automatically change the values of expenses and show a new profit. Overall, we bridged mathematics, business and programming from the simple creation of an apple pie.

End of Term Play – William Tell (Scenes 1-6)

Students read and acted out William Tell. We learned a lot of vocabulary while learning about how to bring a character to life. To end the term, we performed part of the play in front of an audience of parents and friends. Please find the full play below.

William Tell – Scene 1
William Tell – Scene 2
William Tell – Scene 3
William Tell – Scene 4
William Tell – Scene 5
William Tell – Scene 6

Happy Holidays! See you next term! – Mr. Tucker

2019/20 Elm Class – Term 1

Responsibility and Nature

Working together to produce a nice result.

The theme this term was centered around responsibility and how we must shoulder certain burdens to keep society going. We looked at topics such as protecting the global environment, how Medieval people worked to maintain society, and how to respect one another. It’s been a busy term, here’s a look at some of what Elms have done in their different core subjects.

Literacy

Two students working on their narrative tales.

  • Introductory letters – Each student wrote a letter to introduce themselves to the class.
  • Apple pie recipes – Students made apple pies following a recipe, sold them, and then made a class poster about organic farming. We later used the business experience for ICT.
  • Narrative tales – Students compared the narrative tales of William Tell and Snow White, learning about the different stages of a basic story (introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution).
  • Writing their own Medieval narrative tale – Students wrote their own narrative tale centered around a Medieval conflict of a noble banning apple consumption for peasants. Used knowledge from history to make the stories feel realistic.
  • Class play – Students then took the story they wrote and used it to write a Medieval style play.
  • Class book – The Jungle Book. Students were introduced to the law of the jungle and the responsibilities Mowgli must carry with him while challenging their vocabulary.
  • Through these different forms of text, students practised grammar such as simple past tense and connectives. They also practised structures commonly found in texts listed above and challenged to expand their vocabulary. We will continue to work on these fundamentals throughout the academic year.

Bilingual History and Geography

Pupils learned about the Medieval way of life.

To start with, students planted grains, winnowed them, and then milled them by hand.

They then took their hand-milled flour and made bread.

We baked the bread while learning about Medieval food.

Additionally, we learned about Medieval clothing and made our own.

We made a Medieval dance as well!

The objectives of this term were to learn about the characteristics of Medieval society and its people. We focused heavily on social status and how it worked with the system of Feudalism as a whole. For example, through winnowing and milling grains ourselves, we learned concretely how much work went into making a single loaf of bread, which gave students a basis for understanding why white bread would be for the richer nobles while brown, coarse bread was for the peasants. We also looked at Medieval clothing, housing and other aspects of general life to build an idea of how people lived in the past and how that compares to today.

Pour découvrir les activités en français, téléchargez le PDF ici !

La découverte de la période médiévale à travers différentes activités culturelles, artistiques et culinaires.

ICT / Computer Class

Students busily creating their Excel-style spreadsheets.

Students were introduced to touch typing and Excel spreadsheets. First we practised how to type with our fingers in the right place, particularly focused on typing with two hands. We will continue to work on this skill throughout the academic year. Later we took our apple pie business and itemised the expenses and income of the business on a spreadsheet. The spreadsheet proved to be an excellent introduction into the world of accounting, business, and programming. Students itemised the inventory needed to make apple pie (e.g. apples, flour, butter, sugar), but then used the computer to multiply the price and quantity of the ingredients and add them together for a final expense. We did the same for income and subtracted the final income and expense to calculate the profit. The spreadsheet worked so that any change of inventory would automatically change the values of expenses and show a new profit. Overall, we bridged mathematics, business and programming from the simple creation of an apple pie.

Building Environmental Awareness

We learned about the impact of global climate change throughout the weeks of Global Climate strikes. Considering the term was about nature and responsibility, it was perfect timing, and there’s no time better to start learning about the environment than today. Caro came in as a guest speaker to educate us on how we can live a zero-waste life in order to stop wasting plastic. We learned a lot from her talk and challenged ourselves to waste less and help our planet now.

End of Term Play – The Delirious Duchess

Elms took their narrative stories and used them to create their own playscript, which we then acted out in front of an audience. The plot and characters were created by the students from scratch. They used their knowledge from Medieval history and how to create a story to create this play.

Elms Scene 1
Elms Scene 2
Elms Scene 3
Elms Scene 4
Elms Scene 5
Elms Scene 6

Happy Holidays! See you next term! – Mr. Tucker